Just How Important Is Play For Your Child’s Development?

Most people still think that when children play, they are primarily passing time — but they’re wrong. Children gain a great deal from playing, and there are different ways in which they can enjoy this important activity. Under the proper guidance, ...
Read More

Nurture Your Preschooler’s EQ for Long-Term Success

As your child hits the milestones of development and prepares to start preschool, you may become anxious about how he or she will cope with the changes ahead. It’s possible ...
Read More

Our Top Tips For Dealing With A Passive Aggressive Child

Psychology has helped us gain an amazing awareness of what goes through people’s minds when faced with various situations and ...
Read More

Spanish for fun! Spotlighted By Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce

Spanish for fun! is the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce’s Member of the Month for October! At Spanish for fun! ...
Read More

Nurture Your Preschooler’s EQ for Long-Term Success

As your child hits the milestones of development and prepares to start preschool, you may become anxious about how he or she will cope with the changes ahead. It’s possible that for the first time you are releasing your child to the care of people who are not family or close friends. If you’re wondering how your child will handle this situation, it’s in large part a matter of their emotional intelligence, or EQ (emotional intelligence quotient). You may be surprised to learn that possessing ...
Read More

Just How Important Is Play For Your Child’s Development?

Most people still think that when children play, they are primarily passing time — but they’re wrong. Children gain a great deal from playing, and there are different ways in which they can enjoy this important activity. Under the proper guidance, play can be structured, deliberate and intentional without cutting out the fun children get from it. Let’s take a closer look at the benefits of play.

During the early years of childhood, children stand to gain a lot from playing in groups. The following post breaks down the stages of a child’s interaction during play in the early years:

The Importance of Group Play for Early Years Children

Play is a natural mode of learning for early years children, and indeed the default mode for the very youngest. Therefore it’s no surprise that preschool settings are equipped and organised to facilitate such activities. And given that children attend in numbers, there are plenty of formal and informal times when they are engaged in group play. Whilst there is little doubt this is highly enjoyable for all participants, discovering the extent to which they really interact with each other on these occasions, what they gain from the experience, and what childcare professionals can learn from observing this dynamic process, is a more complex and challenging task. Read more at First Discoverers…

It’s important to remember that not all children develop at the same pace, so you shouldn’t be too worried when your child seems to be behind his or her peers.

Nowadays, play is becoming more interesting, incorporating various technological media. The following post describes an example of an innovative play tool for children and its benefits:

Despite the many benefits available from play and sociable interaction, time for free play has been markedly reduced for some children. In the US, many school districts responded to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, by reducing time committed to recess, the creative arts, and even physical education in an effort to focus on reading and mathematics.

While the idea of play might be under threat from traditional methods of education, one startup is hoping to use technology to help children play while advancing their cognitive abilities.

Papumba is a developer and publisher of educational games for mobile devices, which aim to help young children develop cognitive abilities while playing with quality educational, interactive applications. Read more at Sociable…

You can make play more interesting for your child by incorporating time for him or her to play with educational apps that can boost development.

Guided play isn’t just important in preschool, it’s also essential in the home. The following post describes how you can help your child play and learn when they’re not in school:

Learning Through Play

So how do we encourage play for school-age children?

Make sure children are not over-scheduled. Leave time for open-ended, unstructured play.

Engage in play with your child when you can. Be willing to participate in pretend play; dress up, act silly, and be creative.

Follow your child’s lead. Take direction from your child and strive to follow what she wants to do, not necessarily what you want to do.

Respect when children want to play on their own. Sometimes children at play want to be on their own and sometimes they want to play with others. As children play and learn, be sure to look in occasionally to see if their preferences have changed and they are now looking for a playmate. Read more at Bright Horizons…

When you enroll your child in a preschool that understands the importance of play for development, they are set to gain a great deal. Spanish for fun!, one of the top preschools in North Carolina, features an entirely play-based curriculum.

This unique daycare boasts a Spanish immersion preschool and childcare program that provides a well-rounded education that teaches Spanish language and culture in a naturally child-friendly way.

Call us today at 919-881-1695 or complete the contact form on our website to schedule a tour of our Duraleigh Campus. We look forward to meeting you and showing you classroom examples of educational play in action.

Nurture Your Preschooler’s EQ for Long-Term Success

As your child hits the milestones of development and prepares to start preschool, you may become anxious about how he or she will cope with the changes ahead. It’s possible that for the first time you are releasing your child to the care of people who are not family or close friends. If you’re wondering how your child will handle this situation, it’s in large part a matter of their emotional intelligence, or EQ (emotional intelligence quotient).

You may be surprised to learn that possessing a high IQ is considered by some experts to be less important for life success than having a high emotional intelligence. The following post examines this finding:

EQ vs IQ: Why emotional intelligence will take your kid further in life

One day on the school bus, six-year-old student Martin Moran gave a toy car he’d brought from home to a boy with special needs. He had noticed that no one ever wanted to sit next to the boy, who was often disruptive during the ride. Martin’s plan worked—the distraction helped the other child focus and stay calm, says Martin’s mom, Jessica Moran.

“It was his idea. Martin’s pretty in tune with other kids’ emotions and came up with that solution on his own,” says Moran.

The story illustrates her son’s high EQ, or emotional intelligence quotient. It’s a skill set that’s been getting a lot of buzz, with some experts and educators saying it matters more than IQ—your child’s intelligence quotient. Read more at Today’s Parent…

Emotional intelligence creates many favorable character traits in your child that will not only lay a good foundation for his or her own life, but will also enhance his or her ability to be a positive influence to the society. Isn’t that success?

With such valuable information, it is important to find out what could hinder your child having a strong EQ. The following post explains one of the common threats to EQ in children today:

How Technology Lowers Emotional Intelligence in Kids

In Three Mistakes Parents Make with Technology, I advised parents to create family guidelines for technology in their homes. Now, we’ll examine the effects of over reliance on technology and how it can diminish kids’ emotional intelligence.

I am defining technology as any external mechanism that disrupts your kid’s ability to be present with his or her thoughts and feelings, and attuned to others. That includes any device that draws your kid’s attention away from the moment—such as ear buds, smart phones, laptops—and dulls his or her senses to the world and the people in it. Read more at Psychology Today…

An awareness of technology as having the potential to rob your child of EQ is critical. As a parent, it’s your responsibility to cultivate a lifestyle that is healthy and conducive for his EQ to thrive.

There are also some things you can do to positively invest in your child’s EQ. The following post describes them in detail:

How to Strengthen Your Child’s Emotional Intelligence

When emotions run high, people do and say things they normally would not. When you’re a young child, this is what you do all the time.

Emotional self-regulation, a large component of emotional intelligence, is the ability to manage one’s experience and expression of emotions. With practice, children improve their capacity for emotional self-regulation. By age four, most children start to use strategies to eliminate disturbing external stimuli. In other words, they cover their eyes when they’re scared and plug their ears when they hear a loud noise.

It’s not until age 10 that children consistently use more complex strategies for emotional self-regulation. These strategies can be broken down into two simplistic categories: those that attempt to solve the problem and those that attempt to tolerate the emotion. Read more at The Gottman Institute…

As you put those measures into practice, you also need to ensure your child enrolls in a school that will support her emotionally as well as academically.

Spanish for fun! is a Spanish immersion preschool and daycare with an original curriculum that adopts a holistic approach to learning. We believe in giving children opportunities to discover, share and have fun while learning. We are also committed to handling each child with the tender loving care they need for proper growth and emotional maturity.

Call us at 919-677-7114 or fill out the contact form on our website to schedule a tour of our Cary Campus. We welcome the opportunity to show you firsthand the success of our teaching methods.

Our Top Tips For Dealing With A Passive Aggressive Child

Psychology has helped us gain an amazing awareness of what goes through people’s minds when faced with various situations and settings. These insights include the thought patterns and responses of children. Let’s take a closer look at one common response exhibited children when they are upset: Passive aggressiveness. You might be surprised to discover that you’ve been dealing with this issue in your own children. If you have, we’re going to help you tackle it.

First things first: what is passive aggressive behavior? The following post describes this in detail, so that you can identify it in any child:

What is “passive psychological aggression”?

Passive psychological aggression is a means of protecting an individual’s vulnerable or unconscious emotional lives through non direct emotional, verbal, or mental means.

Passive aggressive behavior can be blatantly obvious at times, although it’s commonly expressed in a more subtle manner. This can include:

Avoiding direct communication

Procrastination

Making excuses

Non-responsiveness

Performing jobs poorly on purpose

Playing the “victim”

Placing the blame on others

Sarcasm

Backhanded compliments

Silence  Read more at Louis Laves…

Whenever you notice your child refuses to communicate directly with you, especially when you expect him to be angry, it could be a passive aggressive expression of anger.

Have you ever wondered why your child does this instead of just saying that he isn’t happy? Well, as the following post explains, it is a “safe” way of expressing his emotions:

Child’s Play: Why Passive Aggression Works So Well for Children

Lest you think that passive aggressive behavior is only for the experienced antagonizer, it should be noted that younger children are perfectly capable of using compliant defiance. Like their older counterparts who gather that passive aggression can be more satisfying (and often less likely to result in punishment or immediate confrontation) than overt aggression, even preschool-aged children catch on to the fact that a tantrum in the candy aisle will result in being whisked out of a store, but pretending not to hear Mommy say “Look but don’t touch” can easily result in an “accidentally” unwrapped candy bar and subsequent chocolate purchase! Read more at Psychology Today…

In short, passive aggressive behavior is used to get one’s way through manipulation. If not, it can be used to pay back for what the person wasn’t freely given. This behavior should be dealt with quickly, before it escalates into emotional immaturity.

So, is your child passive aggressive? What do you think you can do about it? Here are some tips on how to handle the issue:

How to Manage Passive-Aggressive Behavior in Children

A passive-aggressive child attempts to gain power over their parents by ignoring demands, questions and responsibilities. According to Empowering Parents, passive aggressive children don’t know how to communicate when they are feeling angry or anxious, and instead of acting out they become resistant and closed off emotionally. If you have a passive-aggressive child you might find yourself chasing them all over the house, constantly reminding them of their chores and homework and inevitably helping them complete their responsibilities.

Step 1

Stay calm and remain in control of your emotions. It can be easy to get into an argument with your child when they are being passive aggressive, giving excuses or becoming upset. Remember that your child’s behavior is their coping mechanism and when you remain firm and in control you will help to deescalate the situation. Read more at Livestrong…

It is important to handle your child’s needs appropriately, whatever those needs are. This way, the correction you instill, for instance, will be consistent. This is also why you should enroll your child in a preschool that is aware of his or her needs.

If you are looking for a preschool that understands children’s needs and is willing and ready to walk with you and your child through his or her development, welcome to Spanish For Fun. In addition, your child’s early education will be delivered effectively in a healthy environment. Here is an excerpt of our philosophy:

At Spanish for fun! we utilize a combination of Spanish immersion curriculum, international curriculum and the early education creative curriculum of North Carolina. This has been developed around a play-based philosophy as well as paying close attention to each child’s social emotional state by exposing them to all 5 love languages (based off of the research done by Dr. Gary Chapman). A play based philosophy means we believe that children naturally engage in and enjoy play as a way of learning on their own terms and at their own pace.

Spanish for fun! was recently named the Member of the Month for October by the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce. Call us at 919-881-1160 or complete the contact form on the website to schedule a tour of our Wake Forest Campus. We look forward to meeting you.

Spanish for fun! Spotlighted By Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce

Spanish for fun! is the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce’s Member of the Month for October!

At Spanish for fun! our program is a unique mix of Spanish language immersion, cultural appreciation and the creative curriculum of North Carolina. This blend is developed around a play-based educational method. We also focus on the social and emotional development of children by exposing them to all five love languages. As defined by the research of Dr. Gary Chapman, they are: Acts of Service, Gift Giving, Physical Touch, Quality Time, and Words of Affirmation.

A play-based approach works with the natural inclination of children to use play as a means of learning on their own terms and at their own pace. Our job as teachers is to provide a safe and nurturing environment, guide them with developmentally appropriate activities, and create opportunities for them to explore and learn through play.

We provide a supportive atmosphere that encourages each child to develop physically, socially, emotionally, and cognitively. Our curriculum is taught entirely in Spanish, in a way that is fun and natural. Our students are not only exposed to the Spanish language but Latin culture in general. This inspires them to explore the world as it exists beyond their own upbringing.

Spanish for fun! daycare Wake Forest NC

The Benefits of Learning a Second Language

Studies show that bilingual children reason faster than monolingual children. They are more creative, flexible and open-minded in their thinking and they possess a greater capacity for problem solving.

Amazingly, research reveals that bilingual people actually have more gray matter because the brain undergoes structural changes from learning a new language. The magnitude of the transformation is limited by age — if the new language is acquired before the age of five, the changes are more significant. It’s interesting to note that children can learn up to five languages at the same time from birth.

Colleges and universities require foreign language education for admission. By the same token, learning another language helps to improve SAT scores. Studies show that for every year an individual studies a foreign language, their SAT scores improve.

Knowing a foreign language increases travel opportunities and allows the speaker to have more authentic interactions with the people they meet along the way.

Spanish for Fun! Wake Forest NC Preschool dayacre

Why It’s Wise To Learn Spanish in Particular

North Carolina has one of the fastest growing Hispanic populations in the U.S. Despite this trend, bilingual education has failed to become a priority for the educational system. Even foreign language education, which is ranked as highly as other basic academic fields by the National Commission of Excellence in Education, lacks strong and consistent support by state education leaders.

This is shortsighted because Spanish is the second-most spoken language globally, with 392 million Spanish speaking people in 22 countries around the world. Spanish is the second-most studied language after English, with more than 14 million students learning in 90 countries where it is not an official language.

The U.S. is the third-largest Spanish speaking country in the world. By the time today’s children are adults in 2050, an estimated 25 percent of the American population will be Latino.

According to the latest research, each year 200,000 Americans lose job opportunities because they do not know another language. This won’t be a roadblock to success for children who attend Spanish for fun!

If you want your child to have the developmental advantages and educational benefits that come from learning a second language, Spanish for fun! is your best option. Get in touch with us today to schedule a tour of our Wake Forest campus. Call 919-883-2061 or complete the form on the website and we’ll get back with you. We look forward to showing you why your child will thrive with us.

Follow us!

Categories

Latest News